A comparative study of glycaemic variability using four different Point-of-Care Testing (POCT) devices

  • Peter Paul Mwinsanga Dapare Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, School of Allied Health Sciences, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana
  • Yussif Adams Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, School of Allied Health Sciences, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana
  • Simon Bannison Bani Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, School of Allied Health Sciences, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana
  • Moses Banyeh Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, School of Allied Health Sciences, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana
  • Eric Mishio Bawa Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, School of Allied Health Sciences, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana
  • Endorah Fotwe Blankson Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, School of Allied Health Sciences, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana
Keywords: glucometer, point-of-care, blood glucose, glycaemia

Abstract

Background: Blood glucose measurement is a way of monitoring changes in glycaemia. Different point-of-care testing (POCT) glucose meters are on the market and hence there is an increase in variability of the results given by these meters. This study sought to measure the glycaemic variability using four different point-of-care glucose meters
Methods: Four point of care glucometers namely; Accu-chek performer nano, OneTouch select plus flex, OneTouch Ultra 2 and Easy Check were used test blood samples from a total of 100 patients visiting the collection point of the Tamale Teaching Hospital Laboratory. A chemistry analyzer (Mindray BS 240 fully automated) was used as the reference method.
Results: The median (interquartile range), Bland Altman Plot and Regression Equation were used to assess the agreement between the various meters and the reference method. The OneTouch Select plus had the least bias (-0.85) and the the OneTouch Ultra 2 had the highest bias (1.49). The OneTouch select had
the best limits of agreement (-2.51 – 0.82) and the OneTouch Ultra 2 had the widest limits of agreement (-1.91 – 4.89) when compared to the reference
method.
Conclusion: OneTouch Select plus had the best agreement with the reference method and the OneTouch Ultra 2 had the least agreement with the reference method. Blood glucose meters should be used for the monitoring of blood glucose however, it should not be used as a diagnostic tool.

Annals of Medical Laboratory Science (2021) 1(2), 1 - 8

References

American Diabetes Association (2017). Classification and diagnosis of diabetes. Diabetes care 40 (Supplement 1), S11-S24.

Cohen M., Boyle E., Delaney C. and Shaw J. (2006) A comparison of blood glucose meters in Australia. Diabetes research and clinical practice 71(2), 113-118.

Dungan K., Chapman J., Braithwaite S.S. and Buse J. (2007) Glucose measurement: confounding issues in setting targets for inpatient management. Diabetes care 30(2), 403-409.

Ekhlaspour L., Mondesir D., Lautsch N., Balliro C., Hillard M., Magyar K., Radocchia L.G., Esmaeili A., Snha M. and Russell S.J. (2017) Comparative accuracy of 17 point-of-care glucose meters. Journal of diabetes science and technology 11(3), 558-566.

Essack Y., Hoffman M., Rensburg M., Van Wyk J., Meyer C. and Erasmus R. (2009) A comparison of five glucometers in South Africa. Journal of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa 14(2), 102-105.

Freckmann G., Baumstark A., Jendrike N., Zschornack E., Kocher S., Tshiananga J., Heister F. and Haug C. (2010) System accuracy evaluation of 27 blood glucose monitoring systems according to DIN EN ISO 15197. Diabetes technology & therapeutics 12(3), 221-231.

Hellman R. (2012) Glycemic variability in the use of point-of-care glucose meters. Diabetes Spectrum 25(3), 135-140. Hughes M.D. (2009) The business of self-monitoring of blood glucose: a market profile. Journal of diabetes science and technology 3(5), 1219-1223.

Kiechle F.L. and Main R.I. (2000) Blood glucose: measurement in the point-of-care setting. Laboratory Medicine 31(5), 276-282.

Klonoff D.C. (2014) Point-of-care blood glucose meter accuracy in the hospital setting. Diabetes Spectrum 27(3), 174-179.

Kristensen G.B., Nerhus K., Thue G. and Sandberg S. (2006) Results and feasibility of an external quality assessment scheme for self-monitoring of blood glucose. Clinical chemistry 52(7), 1311-1317.

Marshall W. (2012) Glucose (blood, Serum, Plasma). In Clinical Biochemistry.

Poirier J.-Y., Le Prieur N., Campion L., Guilhem I., Allannic H. and Maugendre D. (1998) Clinical and statistical evaluation of self-monitoring blood glucose meters. Diabetes Care 21(11), 1919-1924.

Rajendran R. and Rayman G. (2014) Point-of-care blood glucose testing for diabetes care in hospitalized patients: an evidence-based review. Journal of diabetes science and technology 8(6), 1081-1090.
Published
2021-06-20
How to Cite
Dapare, P. P. M., Adams, Y., Bani, S. B., Banyeh, M., Bawa, E. M., & Blankson, E. F. (2021). A comparative study of glycaemic variability using four different Point-of-Care Testing (POCT) devices. Annals of Medical Laboratory Science, 1(2), 1-8. https://doi.org/10.51374/annalsmls.2021.1.2.0037
Section
Articles

Most read articles by the same author(s)